Tuesday, May 29, 2012

MSNBC: Finding Even Better Ways to Lose Viewers with Chris Hayes!!

Give not one, but two golf-claps to MSNBC. They managed to do an outstanding job of calling attention to themselves by allowing yet another opinionated jackass of an anchor to speak on the air. The saying goes that there is 'no such thing as bad press'.  Well, MSNBC might have proved that wrong this weekend.

Admittedly, I don't watch MSNBC very often at all. They lean so far left that they're about to tip over, fall on their heads, and hurt themselves.  Not even Fox News, which is the most right-leaning news station, is that bad. Usually I'll watch CNN for center-left wing news, Fox for right-wing news, and between the two, I can get the actual picture, which tends to be far more moderate than either of them want to admit. Being moderate, after all, is about as exciting as watching me clean cat hair out of my keyboard.

This weekend, Chris Hayes, one of the MSNBC hosts, stepped in it. And by 'stepped in it', I mean 'built up an entire barn full of manure in which to immerse himself fully, then walked in and took a swan dive into the giant steaming pile'. 

Here's a transcript of what he said on Sunday, May 27th.

CHRIS HAYES: Thinking today and observing Memorial Day, that'll be happening tomorrow.  Just talked with Lt. Col. Steve Burke [sic, actually Beck], who was a casualty officer with the Marines and had to tell people [inaudible].  Um, I, I, ah, back sorry, um, I think it's interesting because I think it is very difficult to talk about the war dead and the fallen without invoking valor, without invoking the words "heroes." Um, and, ah, ah, why do I feel so comfortable [sic] about the word "hero"?  I feel comfortable, ah, uncomfortable, about the word because it seems to me that it is so rhetorically proximate to justifications for more war. Um, and, I don't want to obviously desecrate or disrespect memory of anyone that's fallen, and obviously there are individual circumstances in which there is genuine, tremendous heroism: hail of gunfire, rescuing fellow soldiers and things like that. But it seems to me that we marshal this word in a way that is problematic. But maybe I'm wrong about that.
 "Maybe" you're wrong about that, Chris? Let's get one thing straight. You ARE wrong. Those who signed up to serve our country, and even those who got drafted and served honorably, are all heroes to me, especially those who gave their lives for us.  They even gave you the opportunity to sit in that chair on that lovely set with your perfectly coiffed hair and manicured hands to announce to us that you feel calling these people heroes is 'rhetorically proximate to justifications for more war'.  I think you forgot just who is responsible for securing your 'freedom of speech'.

More importantly, how in the world do you even begin to justify this utterly ridiculous argument? Please explain to me how calling our war dead heroes is in any way related to any justification, 'rhetorically proximate' or otherwise, for war? My great uncle, who was killed in action in World War II, was hardly in a 'rhetorically proximate' position to justify our goal of stopping Hitler from taking over Europe. Dead people don't get the opportunity to determine any justifications for war. Their families certainly don't get the opportunity. The justification for war, at least in the US, is determined by Congress and the President, who order those soldiers and sailors into battle. Your argument is such a non sequitur, it's stunning. Do you really think that people run around saying "Ooooh!  We call our fallen soldiers and sailors heroes, therefore we can now go to war!!!" If I said that to someone, they'd wonder if my head was rhetorically proximate to my anal sphincter.  The less polite ones would tell me I had my head up my arse.

Hayes issued a written apology later. He didn't bother to say it publicly, however. For all we know, someone in the public relations department wrote it for him. 

To MSNBC: I'm never watching your network again, but not because Hayes expressed his opinion. I'm never watching your network again because you hired an idiot, put him on the air, and allowed him to talk to people like he knows things.

First, Hayes insulted veterans and war heroes on Memorial Day weekend. That's just dumb with a capital 'DUH'.  I'm sure the public relations people are having a collective heart attack right now over his tacky statements.  Does he have the right to say those things? Sure. Our heroes fought and died to give him that right. Did he exercise good judgment in saying those on a weekend where we remember our fallen heroes? Just in case you want an actual answer, here it is: NO.

Second, if he makes mindless and foolish statements, passing that off as 'journalism' in order to drive ratings, I'm not going to support that. Give me someone who can actually put together an insightful and well-constructed argument. Hayes clearly can't, and I'm not going to waste my time listening to someone whose brain is rhetorically proximate to that of a dodo bird.

3 comments:

Scott Reu said...

Jae,

As a 20 year member of the USAF, I'm proud of you. We the Military normally sit and listen to all of these remarks, of which normally it's CNN who makes them (but I digress), and wonder how many lemmings out there just believe everything that these news stations say without thinking for themselves. This same mentality of "Drinking the KoolAid" allowed my brothers who served before me in Vietnam to be spat upon and tossed aside. And that is what brings me back from my fury. That one thought makes me go to my happy place.

Why? because I know that I and the kids that I serve with haven't gotten that treatment. We've gotten welcomes at airports and upgrades to First Class on American Airlines just for being in uniform. And we've gotten "Thank You"'s lots and lots of thank you's. I could be in a Airport or stopping for milk at WalMart and I get stopped and thanked.

So the hell with these throwbacks to a time I wish we could understand more, a time when children returned from South West Asia as men. Broken and tired and hurt. Hurt on the inside if not on the outside.

So please, if you stop a man or woman in the Uniform of the United States Military to say Thank You, make sure you look for the Biker with a P.O.W. and a 82nd Airborne patch on his vest or an old man with a Vietnam Vet hat on and say "Thank You". They server just as hard, I think harder as they never got their rightful Thank You from this Nation.

Thanks Jae, and most of America, for being there for our Troops. It means a lot to all of us.

v/r

SgtReuster

Jae Onasi said...

Thanks to all vets, definitely! I agree that the treatment way too many Vietnam vets came home to was atrocious. I was too young then, but my parents, who were Baby Boomers, never treated 'Nam vets with anything but honor, and made sure we kids grew up honoring the service of all our soldiers and sailors.

Scott Reu said...

Thanks, Jae! And I could tell, based on your writing. We "GI's" are far more in tune with whats going on with our Government and the world around us as we are the ones who, not only, have to go to the "Third World Nations" to try and fix their issues, but we see little blurbs on the news and put those things together with what we see at work every day and know whats coming.

Thanks for all who think for themselves and thanks, again, for your post.

SgtReuster